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Low-Maintenance Perennial Planting

May 17, 2015

 

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In the garden here clumps of Tellima grandiflora are looking gorgeous mingling with Spanish bluebells in a 3 metre long bed.  For the last ten years or so I’ve managed to remind myself, and to stick to, the advice to always plant at least five of the same herbaceous plants in any one border. This avoids the stamp album effect i.e. masses of different plants performing singly and at different times. And this particular plant combination is very low maintenance. With little attention from me the bluebell flowers and their strappy green leaves fill the bed every spring combining with clumps of tellima at the beginning of April. Then in May the soft- yellow flowers emerge on 30cm stems and bloom for several weeks.

On the allotment  a severe frost overnight three weeks ago left the fresh green leaves of the potatoes dramatically blackened and soggy. So I forked together on a tarpaulin a few of bags of well-rotted horse manure with the 6 month old contents of a compost bin and smothered the lot over the rows of damaged leaves.  They valiantly pushed through the mulch and here they are looking very healthy again.

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The strawberry plants are smothered in flowers so they’ve been given a good feed and bedding straw spread under the flowering stems to protect the fruit from the muddy soil.

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Jiffy plugs have worked well with sturdy Cosmos ‘Sensation’ seedlings coming through ready to be planted in the cutting garden in a week or two.

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The buds on the shrub roses are fattening up and about to open. In the meantime and in contrast I’ve picked a few sprays of the delicate Saxifraga ‘London Pride’…

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..and the Welsh poppy Meconopsis cambrica…

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…and Viburnum macrocephalum Chinese Snowball …

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. May 18, 2015 8:07 pm

    Chinese Snowball, those ones are among my favourites! 🙂

  2. May 19, 2015 8:27 am

    Mine too and I’m hoping the shrub will grow enormous so that I can pick lots for the house.

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