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Defeating Slugs and Snails

October 8, 2015

Determined to get more colour in the beds for September/October I started a major overhaul of the bed I rejigged this spring. The herbaceous plants chosen last May/June were seriously demolished by slugs living in the old stone walls. Survivors were Verbena bonariensis, Aquilegias and Festuca glauca so these will be increased by division and cuttings.  Japanese anemone hybrida ‘Max Vogel’ seems resistant to slugs and snails so five 9cm pots of these will go near the wall…

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And because I needed to get going in the glorious weather last week I bought a container-grown shrub rose from David Austin on-line (rather than wait for bare-root in six weeks time).  Rosa ‘Munstead Wood’ arrived in a huge carton with the deep plastic pot secured at the base and with instructions to keep the box upright.  These instructions had been followed to the letter and it arrived in perfect condition and in full flower and it’s completely wonderful and I am delighted …

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The fall is upon us so time to bag up the leaves for leaf mould next year. I retrieved six bags from behind the garden shed from last Autumn and it was rich and moist and ready to cover the cleared beds around the newly planted rose…

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On a role in the glorious sunshine, fifty Allium bulbosum bulbs were planted since it was the best thing in the garden for many weeks this summer…

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And 20 Allium siculum bulbs were planted in the new bed …

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…to come up around the new rose and around the existing Rosa glauca…

Rosa_glauca_img_2726And five more clumps of white cyclamen were planted under the Amelanchier trees…

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I’ve been loving the view through the kitchen window with a neighbour’s Virginia creeper lounging over the back wall.  I wanted nothing more than that colour in the house and mixed the leaves with Amelanchier canadensis in pretty glasses…DSCN5540

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8 Comments leave one →
  1. October 8, 2015 3:40 pm

    Stone walls are bad news for gardeners re slugs and snails – we have masses of both. Munster wood looks fab, and I love the alliums you’ve selected too. Kitchen window views are so important, I think they’re a success if I find I spend more time looking at the plants rather the pan I’m meant to be stirring!

    • October 9, 2015 9:15 am

      Yes and borrowed views are an even bigger bonus. The walnut tree next door looked spectacular last night with the street light illuminating its pineapple yellow leaves.

  2. October 8, 2015 6:34 pm

    You made such good choices. I think honey lilies are wonderful. I especially like the way they turn from hanging down bells to upright candlelabras. What a lovely leaf combination, picking up the colours outside too!

    • October 9, 2015 9:18 am

      Honey lilies are new to me (and the name) so I shall look forward to how they perform. Yes a good colour combo to look forward to with the roses on either side,

  3. October 9, 2015 4:01 pm

    Having ideal hiding places for the snails is not good! They don’t need any encouragement!

  4. October 10, 2015 10:24 am

    But the plus of course is old stone walls are a lovely back-drop to roses etc !

  5. October 11, 2015 9:01 am

    I’m looking forward to seeing that border early next summer – Rosa glauca looks like a perfect colour match for A. siculum. It’s nice to be clearing and planning at the end of the summer – it’s what I’m up to today in the gardens here and luckily have nice weather for it!

  6. October 11, 2015 10:24 am

    Yes I am very pleased that I got on and remedied the bed- it was niggling me. It also made bulb planting easier having a clean slate and I could envisage the alliums coming up and through other stuff. I rescued most of the slug-damaged plants weeks ago putting them in pots to recover and re-planting in the middle bed which is less prone to slug and snail attack.Enjoy your gardening weekend in this mild and dry weather.

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