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Spring is in the Air

February 18, 2016

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The Ephorbia mellifera was hit by frost two weeks ago and was looking very sorry for itself but today it’s full of healthy pinkish-brown flower buds ready to fill the air with the scent of honey in May.

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My favourite evergreen the woodland spurge Euphorbia robbiae has colonised the ground under the beech hedges.  Acid green flowers emerge from dark green rosettes and will flower until June/July – simply gorgeous.

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The primrose Primula vulgaris is such a sweet flower with the loveliest nature surviving frost and rain to bloom this month.  It’s in the wild border in the garden where I hope it will spread. It’s mingling with some handsome foxgloves not yet in flower.

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A lovely gardener gave me some snowdrops in the green and I’ve separated them and planted clumps under the Amelanchier shrubs to add interest in the wild border.

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Reluctant to pick the hellebores  I sacrificed a few daffodils from this pretty clump flowering against the stone wall.DSCN6230

 

 

 

 

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. February 19, 2016 3:59 pm

    I’ve heard planting snowdrops in the green is really the best way. My bulbs have been unsuccessful. Your daffodils look so pretty in those blue vases.

  2. February 19, 2016 4:40 pm

    Yes snowdrops do very well from a clump that has recently flowered and I am told they’ll spread. I’m so pleased with the daffs and the sweet little vases- it doesn’t take much to get pleasure from a few simple blooms.

  3. February 19, 2016 5:56 pm

    Glad your Euphorbia mellifera bounced back and you can look forward to that delicious smell. I have a couple of Euphorbia stygiana that had grown far too large, so they were hacked back hard in October. I was pleased to see that they have lots of new buds forming … so I didn’t kill them, but I am not sure that I’ll get flowers this year.

  4. February 19, 2016 6:20 pm

    No you’ll probably miss the flowers this year but at least the hard prune will benefit the plant.

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